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‘I am truly ashamed,' says teen involved in Vancouver riot

FUKUMAN

Senior Member
Questions to the memebers:

A- Do you think he deserves more punishment?

B- Do you believe he is really sorry?
< if he didn't get caught he would never have fessed up>

C- Do his parents deserve to be liable for his actions?
<Mind you they had to move out because of threats to them>

http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1011554--i-am-truly-ashamed-says-teen-involved-in-vancouver-riot?bn=1

At least one young rioter has learned the hard way that there is no such thing as a faceless crowd anymore.

Already outed online by furious citizens determined to name and shame participants in last week’s Stanley Cup riots, Nathan Kotylak made an emotional public apology over the weekend for his role in the chaos.

Kotylak, a once-rising star on Canada’s junior water polo team, was caught on camera as he appeared to hold a lighter to a rag stuffed into the gas tank of a Vancouver police car in the violent aftermath of the Canucks’ Game 7 loss to the Boston Bruins.

“For reasons I can’t really explain, I went from being a spectator to becoming part of the mob mentality that swept through many members of the crowd,” the 17-year-old said.

“I want to say as clearly as I can that there is no excuse for my behaviour ... I am truly ashamed of what I did.”

Kotylak would typically remain unidentified under the Youth Criminal Justice Act because he is not yet 18 years old. But he said he wanted to name himself so he could own up to what he did.

His lawyer said he had obtained a court order allowing the young man to make his public apology this weekend.

The consequences have been swift and severe for the athlete from Maple Ridge, B.C., who graduates from high school this year.

He is currently under investigation and could face charges in the matter.

However, in spite of the court order, Vancouver police won’t discuss Kotylak’s case because he is still a minor.

Kotylak’s father, who is a doctor, had to suspend his practice when the family made a decision to leave their home temporarily on Thursday after their address appeared online and they received threats, his lawyer said.

And the teen, who dreamed of one day making it to the Olympics, is understood to have been suspended from the national junior men’s water polo team.

Kotylak cried as he delivered his statement on a local television newscast late Saturday, apologizing to his friends, teammates, the community he grew up in, the Canucks, the Bruins, the Vancouver Police and the city of Vancouver. And finally, to his parents.

“I want to apologize to Mom and Dad,” he said, choking back sobs. “What I did does not reflect the love, values, lessons and great opportunities that you have provided for me.”

The teen also said that he missed his high school convocation on Saturday because he “did not want to detract from this special day that my classmates and I have worked towards all our lives.”

Kotylak said he is not looking for any sympathy.

“I just want to make sure that people know there have already been serious consequences and I anticipate there will be more,” he said on television. “I felt my name had been tarnished and been thrown around in such a manner that this was necessary.”

Water Polo Canada said it suspended a player facing allegations stemming from the post-game riot and would be conducting an investigation.

The organization, which manages national and Olympic teams, did not name the suspended player, but said the junior member had promised full cooperation with the disciplinary process.

“We’re taking immediate action due to the very serious nature of these allegations,” executive director Ahmed El-Awadi said in a statement on Friday.

“His future status will be determined after an investigation has been completed and an official hearing has been conducted,” El-Awadi said, adding any criminal proceedings would take precedence.

Kotylak said his actions were “dumb” and he is ready to take responsibility for what occurred.

“My life took a very bad turn on Wednesday night based on choices I made. Now I must face the consequences.”
 

a 1 player

New member
Questions to the memebers:

A- Do you think he deserves more punishment?
I think 90 days in jail would REALLY teach him a lesson, one that would stick with him for a lifetime.

B- Do you believe he is really sorry?
< if he didn't get caught he would never have fessed up>
I believe that he is probably more sorry for the shit his family is going through than for what he did.

C- Do his parents deserve to be liable for his actions?
<Mind you they had to move out because of threats to them>
No, his parents should not be liable. This was solely his choice and action.
 

T. Bone

New member
No, his parents should not be liable. This was solely his choice and action.
I hear what you are saying but parents have to held accountable for their teenage kids' actions. It is about time parents stop turning a blind eye and start asking their kids what the hell they are doing coming home at midnight during the weeknights and 2 am on weekends.
 

a 1 player

New member
I hear what you are saying but parents have to held accountable for their teenage kids' actions. It is about time parents stop turning a blind eye and start asking their kids what the hell they are doing coming home at midnight during the weeknights and 2 am on weekends.
I wholeheartedly disagree. By the time a child reaches sixteen, they are entirely smart enough to understand right from wrong, and should be held accountable for their actions. As parents, try as we might to teach our children right from wrong, the fact remains that they still have a mind of their own that is out of our hands and our control. To hold a person accountable for the actions of another is beyond evil.
 

Stoner

Senior Member
I wholeheartedly disagree. By the time a child reaches sixteen, they are entirely smart enough to understand right from wrong, and should be held accountable for their actions. As parents, try as we might to teach our children right from wrong, the fact remains that they still have a mind of their own that is out of our hands and our control. To hold a person accountable for the actions of another is beyond evil.
Isn't there a law that says parents are accountable for their kid's action until they turn 18?. Any Lawyers here?.
 

Maurice Boscorelli

Senior Member
In the end we are measured by the sum of our actions.

All the crying and the apologizing in the world cannot change what he did but his future actions can start to change the public opinion him.
 

Bubba

Reviewer
There was a local woman that got caught stealing pants and got fired for her job as a receptionist. She said I was there and just happened to take them. "Did not mean to"


Yeah sure.
 
H

HOF

Guest
In the end we are measured by the sum of our actions.

All the crying and the apologizing in the world cannot change what he did but his future actions can start to change the public opinion him.
Yes, a very foolish young man that could have hurt himself or others. He does need to suffer consequences and make restitution, but this is where the YCJA has the ability to punish but not impair his future. He's outed regardless of being a YO and could suffer consequences in many facets of life.

Let's see if he is remorseful and he's got a long life ahead to regain his reputation.
 
H

HOF

Guest
I wholeheartedly disagree. By the time a child reaches sixteen, they are entirely smart enough to understand right from wrong, and should be held accountable for their actions. As parents, try as we might to teach our children right from wrong, the fact remains that they still have a mind of their own that is out of our hands and our control. To hold a person accountable for the actions of another is beyond evil.
Children learn to lie, cheat and steal in kindergarten! They also know right from wrong long before 16. Under the YCJA, parents are responsible for their children's actions.
 

Maurice Boscorelli

Senior Member
Vancouver Riots Blamed on UFC, NHL By School Board Chair

Vancouver Riots Blamed on UFC, NHL By School Board Chair

n a move that's all too predictable, a Vancouver school board chair named Patti Bacchus has found the time to point the finger at the UFC for their role in the Vancouver riots. The riots started after the Vancouver Canucks lost game seven of the NHL Stanley Cup finals to the Boston Bruins. The following days saw authorities blaming everything from "roving gangs of youths" to "anarchists" all while trying to minimize that it was, more than likely, a stupid mixed group of Canucks fans and people just looking to make trouble. The most recent attempt to blame the UFC is probably the most absurd, however. Via the Vancouver Courier (by way of Yahoo's Puckdaddy):
"The painted faces and hockey itself-it's aggressive, they celebrate the brawling on ice, it's winning, it's dominance. If kids are all watching a UFC game and cheering someone for bloodying up someone else's face, how big a leap is that from cheering on someone smashing a window? It's very mixed messages we're sending to young people who are still in a stage of developing their impulse control and moral development."
And really, it all makes sense.
In 1994, after losing game seven of the Stanley Cup finals to the New York Rangers, Vancouver fans rioted. This, mere months after UFC 2. The angry mob was, of course, not driven by a combination of angry Canucks fans and idiots looking to cause trouble. They were fueled with the anger of 1,000 Pat Smiths, ready to lapel choke the city after yet another Royce Gracie tournament win.
The evidence is overwhelming.


http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2011/6/21/2235817/vancouver-riots-blamed-on-ufc-nhl-by-school-board-chair


The finger pointing would be almost amusing if not for the embarrassment this has caused all Canadians.
 

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